global aCtIVISm at ZKM I Museum of Contemporary Art

global aCtIVISm An exhibition at the ZKM | Museum of Contemporary Art Na Faixa  Photo: Baixcentro  Courtesy: Baixcentro

global aCtIVISm
An exhibition at the ZKM | Museum of Contemporary Art
Na Faixa
Photo: Baixcentro
Courtesy: Baixcentro

 

Duration; Dec 14, 2013–Mar 03, 2014
Location; ZKM | Museum of Contemporary Art

 

The exhibition global aCtIVISm is dedicated to the field of new, twenty first century forms of artistic expression along the lines of an augmented concept of art according to which every person is an artist. Global activism is politically inspired and seeks to draw attention to abuses in the political sphere by means of actions, demonstrations and performances, and demands changes to existing conditions. On the basis of of objects, photographic, cinematographic, video-graphic and mass-media documents, the exhibition shows just how different the roles of art can be in the various regions of the world.

The dynamics of modern democracy began with the three-minute Gettysburg speech held by President Abraham Lincoln in 1863, which promised a ‘government of the people, by the people, for the people’. And it is with this invention of the people (Edmund S. Morgan, Inventing the People. The Rise of Popular Sovereignty in England and America, 1988) that the concept of democracy stands and falls. In the American Declaration of Independence (1776) people were guaranteed inalienable rights, among which were ‘life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness’, but, above all, that ‘governments […] derived their just powers from the consent of the governed’.

Consequently, democracy lives from these dynamics between the government and the governed, between politics and the people. However, what happens when those who represent the people no longer protect the rights and interests of the people, but rather violate them? One possible answer has been demonstrated over the last few decades with the founding of NGOs, non-governmental organizations. These latter assume tasks such as environmental protection, the upholding of human rights, etc. that were originally the responsibility of governments. A second, contemporary example is the current practices of activism, initiated by citizens the source of which is a democratic citizenship. As the word CIVIS (Lat. citizen) in the word activism implies, it involves a new form of ‘performative democracy’ (P. Weibel): through actions and demonstrations, the transformation of existing conditions is demanded in the public sphere.

 

global aCtIVISm An exhibition at the ZKM | Museum of Contemporary Art Monstration in Nowosibirsk  May 01, 2013  Photo: Sergei Mordwinow  Courtesy: Sib.fm

global aCtIVISm
An exhibition at the ZKM | Museum of Contemporary Art
Monstration in Nowosibirsk
May 01, 2013
Photo: Sergei Mordwinow
Courtesy: Sib.fm

 

Through actions by small groups such as Pussy Riot, or mass movements like Occupy and much else, more recent repeated spectacular protest movements have shifted into the focus of a worldwide public. In entirely different, though always impressive ways, they show what civil engagement can achieve in the widest possible sense. On the one hand, the discussion turns on the crisis of democracy, even we speak of a post-democracy. On the other hand, numerous movements of civil participation are everywhere on the increase throughout the world. The Boston Tea Party (1773) slogan, which led to the outbreak of the American civil in 1775, ran: ‘No taxation without representation’. The citizens of today evidently demand ‘no taxation without participation’. global aCtIVISm shifts this new citizens’ engagement to the center of an exhibition. This is suited to effectively counter the conformism of the so-called art market, but also cultural pessimism and its lament of the power of consumerism.

With the exhibition Net_Condition (1999), CRTL [Space].Rhetorics of Surveillance, from Bentham to Big Brother (2001) and Making Things Public (2005), the ZKM had pointed out the options and risks of digital society early on. Similarly, the ZKM has presented the practices of artistic performance and public participation for many years. The practices have now clearly expanded in the spheres of politics.

Art and action entered into a new fusion ever since the expansion of art in the mid-1960s, which then liberated itself from purely artistic intermediality, and increasingly concerned itself with social and human agendas. Art and agency flow into a new form of activism. The artistic function changes from producer of works to the system fugitive, or system critic, capable of pursing tasks formerly the responsibility of state authorities, such as the judiciary, the economy and the administration. In a certain sense, art, like philosophy and media theory forms a place of exile in which fundamental civil tasks are still perceived. The artist’s function also changes with his media: instead of oil paintings, flyers, placards, graffiti are produced, and in the place of wooden structures online portals; transparent, media appearances and Youtube videos replace art film productions.

The exhibition shows global activism or artivism as the first new art form of the twenty first century by means of photographs, films, video, blogs, social media and other mass media documents.

 

global aCtIVISm An exhibition at the ZKM | Museum of Contemporary Art Protesting on Demand  Photo: Floating Lab Collective  Courtesy: Floating Lab Collective

global aCtIVISm
An exhibition at the ZKM | Museum of Contemporary Art
Protesting on Demand
Photo: Floating Lab Collective
Courtesy: Floating Lab Collective

 

Artists:
Adbusters Media Foundation, G.M.B. Akash, Anonymous News Germany, ATTAC, Martin Balluch, Zanny Begg, John Beieler, Bombily Group, Ángela Bonadies & Juan José Olavarría, Nadir Bouhmouch, Osman Bozkurt, Campact, Center for Artistic Activism, Chim↑Pom, Noam Chomsky, Ralf Christensen, Chto delat?, Paolo Cirio, Cyber Guerilla, Hassan Darsi, Johanna Domke & Marouan Omara, Electronic Disturbance Theater, Enmedio, Everyday Rebellion, Femen, Noah Fischer, Floating Lab Collective, Freedom of the Press Foundation, Muath Freij, Isabelle Fremeaux & John Jordan, Jakob Gautel & Jason Karaïndros, Greenpeace, Stéphane M. Grueso, Ed Hall, Hedonistische Internationale, Stéphane Hessel, Niklas Hoffmann, Jim Hubbard, Indymedia, Alexey Iorsh, Just do it (Kim Asendorf & Ole Fach), Amadou Kane Sy, Thomas Kilpper, Kiss my Ba, kreativerstrassenprotest.twoday.net, Mischa Kuball, Jan Jaap Kuiper & Katja Sokolova, Sasha Kurmaz, Christopher LaMarca, Mohammed Laouli, Lynn Lauterbach, Julia Leser & Clarissa Seidel, Let’s Do It!, Viktoria Lomasko, Renzo Martens, Masasit Mati, Mikaela, Mootiro Maps, Carlos Motta, Neozoon, No TAV, occupygezipics.tumblr.com, Otpor!, Partizaning, Jean-Gabriel Périot, Platform, Pussy Riot, R.E.P., Resist, Oliver Ressler, Mykola Ridnyi, Itamar Rose & Yossi Atia, Faten Rouissi, Sandra Schäfer, Bahia Shehab, Lisa Sperling & Florian Kläger, Jonas Staal & Metahaven, Stop the Traffik, Joulia Strauss & Moritz Mattern, Stuttgart 21-Protest, Jackie Sumell, Surveillance Camera Players, Tanya Sushenkova, Aaron Swartz & Taryn Simon, Take The Square, Pelin Tan, Teatro Valle Occupato, The Yes Men, Thomson & Craighead, Patricia Triki & Christine Bruckbauer, Troika, UK Uncut, Various authors organized by Sharon Hayes with Angela Beallor, Voina, Christoph Wachter & Mathias Jud, Mark Wallinger, WANGO, wearethe99percent. tumblr.com, WikiLeaks, Alexander Wolodarskij, Yomango, Malala Yousafzai, Salam Yousri, and others

Project team:
Peter Weibel and Andreas Beitin, Andrea Buddensieg, Dietrich Heissenbüttel, Sabiha Keyif, Elisabeth Klotz, Sarah Maske, Linnea Semmerling, Joulia Strauss, Tatiana Volkova, Philipp Ziegler

www.zkm.de

Related posts

Top